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APA Citation & Formatting : Webpages & Websites

Attention Students!

This guide is a starting point only. For full details on correctly citing resources and creating references, please consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 7th ed. (2020).

It is important to remember that Library staff do not teach APA, and will not evaluate or correct work. If you need help with APA Style, contact your instructor, or contact the Student Success Hub to request a meeting with a peer tutor or the Writing Clinic.

How Do I Cite Webpages & Websites?

Below are some best practices for citing websites and webpages (10.16):

  • Use the webpages and websites category if there is no other reference category that fits, and if the work has no parent or overarching publication, such as a journal.
  • When citing multiple pages from the same website, create a separate reference list entry for each.
  • If a website is mentioned but information from that website is not quoted or referenced, do not create a reference list entry. Instead, include the name of the website in the text of the assignment or paper, followed by the URL in parentheses.
  • The author of a webpage or website may need to be determined from context. Look for an "About" page or the acknowledgements page. If you cannot determine the author from context, consult your instructor or the Library.
  • Provide the most specific date possible.
  • When the name of the author and the name of the site are the same, omit the name of the site from the source component of the reference list entry.
  • Include a retrieval date only when the content of the website or webpage is designed to change over time, and the page is not archived.

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Reference List Entry: Format (10.16)
Author, A. (Date). Title of article. Site name. Retrieval date, if applicable. URL

Example
Watters, H. (May 17, 2020). She spent 10 days in hospital during Walkerton's tainted water scandal. Now she's studying to be a doctor. CBC.ca. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/walkerton-20-anniversary-ecoli-1.5573287

Please Note! Information may be found in multiple locations on a website or webpage. Look at the page or site carefully to find all of the information required for the reference list entry.

Parenthetical Citation 
(Author, Date), e.g.: (Watters, 2020)

Narrative Citation 
Author (Date), e.g.: Watters (2020)

Please Note! This format is used for articles published in online news sources, e.g.: CBC, HuffPost, BBC, etc.

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Reference List Entry: Format (10.16)
Author, A. (Date). Title of article. Site name. Retrieval date, if applicable. URL

Example
Martin Lillie, C.M. (December 29, 2016). Be kind to yourself: How self-compassion can improve your resiliency. Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/self-compassion-can-improve-your-resiliency/art-20267193

Please Note! Information may be found in multiple locations on a website or webpage. Look at the page or site carefully to find all of the information required for the reference list entry.

Parenthetical Citation 
(Author, Date), e.g.: (Martin Lillie, 2016)

Narrative Citation 
Author (Date), e.g.: Martin Lillie (2016)

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Reference List Entry: Format (10.16)
Author, A. (Date). Title of page. Site name. Retrieval date, if applicable. URL

Remember! An author can be a person or multiple people, or a group or organization. 

Example
World Health Organization. (n.d). Food safety. https://www.who.int/health-topics/food-safety/

Remember! If the date does not appear on the page and cannot be determined from context, use "n.d.", for "no date".

Remember! When the name of the author and the name of the site are the same, omit the name of the site from the source component of the reference list entry.

Parenthetical Citation 
(Author, Date), e.g.: (World Health Organization, n.d.)

Narrative Citation 
Author (Date), e.g.: World Health Organization (n.d.)

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Reference List Entry: Format (10.16)
Author, A. (Date). Title of page. Site name. Retrieval date, if applicable. URL

Remember! An author can be a person or multiple people, or a group or organization. 

Example
Statistics Canada. (May 18, 2020). Canada's population clock (real-time model). Retrieved May 18, 2020, https://www.who.int/health-topics/food-safety/

Remember! When the name of the author and the name of the site are the same, omit the name of the site from the source component of the reference list entry.

Remember! If the contents of a page are designed to change over time, include a retrieval date.

Parenthetical Citation 
(Author, Date), e.g.: (Statistics Canada, 2020)

Narrative Citation 
Author (Date), e.g.: Statistics Canada (2020)

Please Note!

This guide is based on the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 7th ed. (2020). Library staff have reviewed the information in this guide, and to the best of our knowledge, it is accurate. However, mistakes do occur. Students bear sole responsibility for ensuring that their citations are correct, and that their assignments meet the criteria laid out by their instructor. Students are encouraged to contact Peer Tutoring or the Writing Clinic for assistance.