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Copyright: In the Classroom

This is a guide to understanding your rights and responsibilities, in relation to copyright, as a member of the Loyalist College community.

Copyright in the Classroom

Content in handouts, presentation slides, audiovisual material, and projections are all protected under copyright. The below sections contain information about using, copying and citing copyright protected works in the classroom. 

Handouts

A short excerpt from a copyright protected work may be provided or communicated to each student enrolled in a class or course. Handouts fall under Fair Dealing:

-An entire chapter from a textbook provided that it does not exceed 10 percent of the textbook
-An entire short story, play, poem, or essay from a collection, provided that it does not exceed 10 percent of the book
-An entire reproduction of an artistic work or a single musical score from a collection provided it does not exceed 10 percent of the book

When copying a complete chapter, even if it doesn't cover 10% of the complete work, further copying from that same work is not allowed.

The source and creator must be cited when reproducing works as handouts.

Citations should prominently appear on the top of the handout.

Below are examples of what should be included in a citation.

You may include a proper APA, MLA, or other citation. 

Book:

Include the book title and author.

"From Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie"

Periodical:

Include the periodical title, date of issue and author.

"From Mythlore, Fall-Winter 2012, by Kayla McKinney-Wiggins"

Online source:

Include the website title, author (if mentioned), and URL.

"From 

Image:

Include the title of image, artist (if mentioned), and URL or title of print source.

“Ripple Effect on Water by Sergiu Bacioiu, Image Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ripple_effect_on_water.jpg”

Image within a document written by the course instructor:

Include the title of the image, artist (if mentioned), and URL or title of print source directly under the image.

“Ripple Effect on Water by Sergiu Bacioiu, Image Source:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ripple_effect_on_water.jpg" 

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Projections/Use on Smartboard

Publishers often make content available to professors who have adopted their textbook for use in a course. Publisher created content can include instructor's manuals, workbooks, tests and presentation slides. Publisher created content is meant to accompany the textbook that is assigned to the class. Therefore, accompanying material must be changed if a different textbook is assigned to a course.

Permission must be sought from the publisher that produced the slides if the slides and the textbook do not come from the same source. 

You must ensure that you have permission to post publisher created materials to Blackboard before posting, whether unchanged or modified.

Section 29.4 (1) of the Copyright Act allows the reproduction of a work for the purpose of display. Display includes using an overhead projector, manually displaying the item, using it on a presentation slide or posting it to Blackboard. 

The following criteria must be adhered to when displaying copies of works:

  • The work must be reproduced for the purpose of education or training, 
  • The work must only be displayed on the premises of an educational institution, includes both the physical classroom and Blackboard, and
  • The creator and source of the reproduced work must be cited.

Section 29.4 (1) does not apply in the case where the work is commercially available in a suitable format. If a textbook includes accompanying slides that contain the information that was to be reproduced, those slides must be used. 

Section 30.04 of the Copyright Act allows the reproduction of a work that is publicly available through the internet.

The following criteria must be adhered to when displaying copies of online works:

  • The creator and source of the reproduced work must be cited. 

Section 30.04 does not apply if the work has a technological protection measure, such as a digital lock, password protection, copyright notice or watermark, that restricts access and/or use to the work. The work must also have been made available through the internet by the copyright owner. 

Image sources and creators must be cited when used in projections or slides. The source of the image is the website that hosts it, not the search engine where it was found. A proper citation includes the image title, name of the creator, name of the source and the URL. Use the most information that you can find if facts, such as artist or title, are not available.

One of two options can be used when citing images in slides:

1. Cite the image on the slide on which it appears. 

2. Cite all of the images in the presentation on a slide at the end of the presentation. 

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